Keeping our Watershed Clean One Volunteer at a Time

Keeping our Watershed Clean One Volunteer at a Time


Throughout this spring and early summer, MountainTrue’s AmeriCorps Water Quality Administrator, Jack Henderson, has been working to coordinate a number of river cleanups around the Green River watershed. These efforts help to make our local rivers safer and cleaner for both wildlife and the public.

From Polk County near Lake Adger to Big Hungry and Pot Shoals, volunteers have removed tons of trash from all over the watershed, including broken glass, a lot of recyclables, and even car bumper. These cleanups help improve the health of our watershed, which creates a more thriving ecosystem. As popular spots for recreation, these sites can quickly accumulate trash that makes paddling, swimming and hiking more dangerous and less beautiful. Thanks to all of the volunteers who helped with these cleanups!

MountainTrue is able to thrive with the help of our supporters and volunteers. We wouldn’t be able to do this without the work they do to keep the places we share safe and clean. To be involved in efforts like keeping the Green River clean, check out our website for volunteer opportunities or sign up for our newsletter to stay up to date on upcoming events!

Thank you again to all the wonderful community members who have assisted in a river cleanup this spring and summer. We can’t wait to meet all of our new volunteers. Our river cleanups are a great way to make a difference in your watershed and make new friends in your community.


Western North Carolina is blessed with more than 1.5 million acres of public land, including Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway and several state-owned parks, forests and natural areas. These public lands support the headwaters of our rivers, beautiful mountain vistas, one of the most diverse temperate forests on the planet, and a thriving economy in tourism, crafts and recreation.
During its 30-year history, WNCA (now MountainTrue) has twice prevented logging in the Asheville Watershed, first in 1990 and again in 2004. Eventually the City of Asheville placed a conservation easement over 17,356 acres of the watershed.

Save the Date! Sunday, October 18: Protect Our Land Picnic

Save the Date! Sunday, October 18: Protect Our Land Picnic

Save the date! The Carolina Land Coalition is having a Protect Our Land Picnic on Sunday, October 18, 2-5 PM. Attend this family-friendly event to enjoy food, fun and take action challenging Duke Energy’s plans!

Date/time: Sunday, October 18, 2-5pm

Location: Historic Henderson County Courthouse, Hendersonville

Who should attend: Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend, because even if power lines won’t run through your property or community, we’ll all pay for this $1.1 billion plan through our utility rates.

Purpose: Stand in unity against Duke Energy’s Western Carolina’s “Modernization” plan and tell elected officials and utility regulators that we oppose this plan. Get up to speed on the latest developments and know all your options for making your voice heard!

Want to help? Sign up to volunteer or donate to help make this event great!


Western North Carolina is blessed with more than 1.5 million acres of public land, including Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway and several state-owned parks, forests and natural areas. These public lands support the headwaters of our rivers, beautiful mountain vistas, one of the most diverse temperate forests on the planet, and a thriving economy in tourism, crafts and recreation.
During its 30-year history, WNCA (now MountainTrue) has twice prevented logging in the Asheville Watershed, first in 1990 and again in 2004. Eventually the City of Asheville placed a conservation easement over 17,356 acres of the watershed.

Fall Scenery Hike with Bob Gale

10/6: Fall Scenery Hike with Bob Gale

Fall-Scenery-HileJoin MountainTrue Ecologist & Public Lands Director Bob Gale for a Fall Scenery Hike to remember. We’ll be doing a light trek on the Pilot Cove Loop up to a rock face with a beautiful vista. If we’re lucky, we’ll get to see some migrating monarch butterflies surfing the warm thermal wind over the outcrop. Though monarch populations have suffered in recent years, we’ve seen a few more this year. So, keep your fingers crossed. Bob will discuss the challenges to their incredible migrating journey, and will also interpret the flora and fauna along the way.

Click here to register for the event.

This is a 3-3/4 mile round-trip loop, which begins along a creek, goes through old growth and other forest communities, and offers distant views. Bob will discuss forestry practices and guide you on walk through a beaver-altered habitat.

Hiking (and resting time): approximately 4 hours. Involves an initial short if somewhat steep climb and a couple of short uphill climbs along a ridge before descending for the second half of the trip.

Date: Tuesday, October 6, 2015
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Location: Meet at Earthfare in the Westgate Shopping Center, 66 Westgate Pkwy, Asheville
Cost: Free
Registration Deadline: Monday, October 5th at NOON

Click here to register for the event.


Western North Carolina is blessed with more than 1.5 million acres of public land, including Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway and several state-owned parks, forests and natural areas. These public lands support the headwaters of our rivers, beautiful mountain vistas, one of the most diverse temperate forests on the planet, and a thriving economy in tourism, crafts and recreation.
During its 30-year history, WNCA (now MountainTrue) has twice prevented logging in the Asheville Watershed, first in 1990 and again in 2004. Eventually the City of Asheville placed a conservation easement over 17,356 acres of the watershed.

10/20: Plant Trees at Hominy Creek Greenway

10/20 Tree Planting at Hominy Creek

On Tuesday, Oct 20, help beautify and plant trees on the beach near the Hominy Creek Greenway.  These trees will become a live-staking cultivation site. We’ll be able to cut branches from them in the future to use as live stakes, which will help stabilize river banks and keep sediment pollution from entering the river.

Come out and get your hands dirty for the river! Sign up here.

 


Western North Carolina is blessed with more than 1.5 million acres of public land, including Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway and several state-owned parks, forests and natural areas. These public lands support the headwaters of our rivers, beautiful mountain vistas, one of the most diverse temperate forests on the planet, and a thriving economy in tourism, crafts and recreation.
During its 30-year history, WNCA (now MountainTrue) has twice prevented logging in the Asheville Watershed, first in 1990 and again in 2004. Eventually the City of Asheville placed a conservation easement over 17,356 acres of the watershed.

9/17: Mt. Hardy – Wolf Mountain Day Hike

9/17: Mt. Hardy – Wolf Mountain Day Hike

Join MountainTrue, the Asheville History Center and NC Botanical Society founder Dan Pittillo on this day hike along the Bartram Trail to discover the natural world as William Bartram might have done: through identification of plants and observation. You’ll learn more about Bartram himself and the impact of early Naturalists on contemporary ecology. The trip departs from Asheville History Center, 283 Victoria Road at 9 a.m. and will return at 5 p.m.

$35 members; $50 non-members – Transportation, snacks and water provided; participants should pack a lunch.

Reservations are required. To save your spot, email smh@wnchistory.org or call 828-253-9231.

*Please note: Moderate walking of one mile or less on uneven surfaces is a requirement of this trip.


Western North Carolina is blessed with more than 1.5 million acres of public land, including Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway and several state-owned parks, forests and natural areas. These public lands support the headwaters of our rivers, beautiful mountain vistas, one of the most diverse temperate forests on the planet, and a thriving economy in tourism, crafts and recreation.
During its 30-year history, WNCA (now MountainTrue) has twice prevented logging in the Asheville Watershed, first in 1990 and again in 2004. Eventually the City of Asheville placed a conservation easement over 17,356 acres of the watershed.

10/8: Annual Members’ meeting

10/8: Annual Gathering for Members and Supporters

Please join us on October 8 for our Annual Gathering and enjoy food from Saffron Fine Foods by Homegrown restaurant, complimentary beer from Hi-Wire Brewing and live music. At 6 PM, we will speak briefly about the state of the organization, what we’ve accomplished this year and where we’re heading in the future! We’ll also be handing out awards and thanking some of our most inspiring supporters!
Thursday, October 8, 2015
5:00- 8:00 PM
$10 Suggested Donation
Hi-Wire Brewing
2 Huntsman Place
Asheville, NC  28803
Annual_Meeting_Invite-1
A Note about Directions:
This is Hi-Wire Brewing’s brand new Biltmore Village production facility and taproom located directly behind Appalachian Vintner. Please enter the exact address of 2 Huntsman Place into your GPS for driving directions or click the map below. The event IS NOT taking placing at the ‘South Slope’ location.

Hi-Wire


Western North Carolina is blessed with more than 1.5 million acres of public land, including Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway and several state-owned parks, forests and natural areas. These public lands support the headwaters of our rivers, beautiful mountain vistas, one of the most diverse temperate forests on the planet, and a thriving economy in tourism, crafts and recreation.
During its 30-year history, WNCA (now MountainTrue) has twice prevented logging in the Asheville Watershed, first in 1990 and again in 2004. Eventually the City of Asheville placed a conservation easement over 17,356 acres of the watershed.