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Wild & Scenic Film Festival Comes to WNC for Sixth Year

Wild & Scenic Film Festival Comes to WNC for Sixth Year

Join MountainTrue for the 2016 Wild & Scenic Film Festival, featuring the year’s best short-form nature, wilderness and outdoor adventure films. This year’s festival takes place on the beautiful grounds of Sierra Nevada’s Mills River Brewery under the open sky of an outdoor amphitheater carved into the side of a hill and located on the banks of the French Broad River. The event begins at 7:00 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. Get there early to grab a drink, explore the gardens and snag a prime viewing spot!

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Save the French Broad, One Fish at a Time

Save the French Broad, One Fish at a Time

For the month of August, fishing will be good throughout the French Broad River Watershed for both fishers and non-fishers alike. In partnership with Sweetwater, MountainTrue is hosting a campaign to clean up the French Broad River through the sale of paper fish in local restaurants, bars and businesses. Show your support for swimmable, fishable and drinkable water in the French Broad.

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9/10: Henderson County Big Sweep

9/10: Henderson County Big Sweep

The community is invited to lend a hand and help clean up Henderson County’s rivers and streams. Join MountainTrue on Saturday, September 10 for the annual Henderson County Big Sweep – a county-wide litter cleanup program that brings citizens and community organizations together to clear trash from their waterways. Civic organizations, Scout troops, church groups, school groups, Adopt-A-Stream teams, neighborhood associations, city and county departments, local businesses, and individuals can all pitch in to make our waters cleaner and healthier. Form a team with friends and family or join an existing team.

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MountainTrue Raleigh Report, Issue 21: Hallelujah, That Session Is Over

MountainTrue Raleigh Report, Issue 21: Hallelujah, That Session Is Over

In this edition of the MountainTrue Raleigh Report – It’s OVER! On Friday, legislators adjourned the short session sine die and headed back home – just in time for the Fourth of July holiday. Up until the very end of session, there were a number of important bills still up in the air. Some good things happened and some bad things didn’t. Here’s the rundown on the end of session – and our overall take on what The Honorables did and didn’t do this year.

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The Gospel in the Ecological Crisis

The Gospel in the Ecological Crisis

rom the California drought to Missouri floods to our changing growing seasons, climate change is already affecting people around the world, in our country and here in North Carolina. To help our faith communities address the impacts of climate change and ecological crisis, the Center for Earth Ethics and Union Theological Seminary gathered faith leaders, including Director of the Creation Care Alliance Scott Hardin-Nieri, in New York City from June 6-10 for a five-day training.

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Bad Coal Ash Bill Being Rushed Through Raleigh

Bad Coal Ash Bill Being Rushed Through Raleigh

On the evening of Tuesday, June 28 the North Carolina Senate rushed through a rewrite to H630, the state’s coal ash cleanup law. This bad coal ash bill is quickly making its way through the legislature and we expect the House to take it up as soon as today. Please call your NC Representative Immediately and ask them to NOT CONCUR with the Senate’s version of House Bill 630.

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Western North Carolina is blessed with more than 1.5 million acres of public land, including Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway and several state-owned parks, forests and natural areas. These public lands support the headwaters of our rivers, beautiful mountain vistas, one of the most diverse temperate forests on the planet, and a thriving economy in tourism, crafts and recreation.
During its 30-year history, WNCA (now MountainTrue) has twice prevented logging in the Asheville Watershed, first in 1990 and again in 2004. Eventually the City of Asheville placed a conservation easement over 17,356 acres of the watershed.