Broad Riverkeeper

 

The Broad Riverkeeper is the primary protector and spokesperson for the rivers and streams of the Broad River watershed in the Western and Piedmont regions of NC. MountainTrue’s Broad Riverkeeper, David Caldwell, works with communities and citizens to monitor water quality and advocate for best management practices that will improve our waters for drinking, swimming, and fishing. From our headwaters along the Eastern Continental Divide and the South Mountains, these streams and rivers which join and flow into the “Big” Broad above the SC state line are a treasure to be enjoyed and cared for. The Broad River Basin includes 5,419 square miles within both North and South Carolina. Five Natural Heritage Program Priority Areas are in the basin: the Rollins/South Mountains Natural Area, Hickory Nut Gorge, the Green River Gorge, the Pacolet River Gorge and Pinnacle Mountain. These areas provide habitat for more than 100 rare plant and animal species and 24 rare natural communities. The Broad Riverkeeper works to protect and promote clean water in Rutherford, Polk and Cleveland counties through educating the public, recreational activities, and fostering stewardship of the waterways.

 

Keep the Broad River Basin Clean

You can help the Broad River Alliance keep the Green, the Second Broad, and the First Broad rivers clean by volunteering with a clean up day or another river event. If you are interested in volunteering, contact David Caldwell at david@mountaintrue.org

Interested in Exploring the Broad River?

Our Broad Riverkeeper is always willing to take folks out on the Broad and First Broad Rivers for half or full day paddles. A limited number of boats can be provided and no experience is necessary. If you’re interested in scheduling a paddle, email David Caldwell at david@mountaintrue.org.

David Caldwell

David Caldwell

Broad Riverkeeper

David Caldwell is the Broad Riverkeeper. David moved into the Broad River watershed in 1987, after receiving an Engineering degree from Clemson University, and worked in manufacturing for several years in Shelby, NC. He has been fishing, paddling, and exploring the Broad River waterways for 27 years now.

envelope broadriveralliance@gmail.com

Broad River Alliance News

Swim Guide Watershed Report: Upper French Broad, Green & Broad River Watersheds

Swim Guide Watershed Report: Upper French Broad, Green & Broad River Watersheds

We continue our review of data from the 2021 Swim Guide season with a look at the water quality of the Upper French Broad, Green, and Broad watersheds. We’ll let you know which areas were the cleanest, where we saw ongoing bacteria pollution problems, and actions you can take to fight for clean waters.

Join Us for an Annual Member Gathering in Your Area!

Join Us for an Annual Member Gathering in Your Area!

We are excited to be gathering in person this year to connect with you, our members, to celebrate our award winners and see each others’ smiling faces!
In light of the current rate of COVID infections and the situation in hospitals across our region, we have chosen to host multiple, smaller, outdoor events in place of one large gathering. We are also requiring that all attendees be fully vaccinated in order to participate. If you are not vaccinated, you will have an opportunity to vote for new and returning board members online.

July 2021 E-Vistas Newsletter

July 2021 E-Vistas Newsletter

In our July E-News we celebrate our Bio-Blitz winners, welcome Sarah Ogletree as the new director of the Creation Care Alliance, expose the impacts of clear-cutting at Bottomley Farms, and more.

One Million Gallons of Sewage Overflowed into Western North Carolina Waterways during Six Month Period

One Million Gallons of Sewage Overflowed into Western North Carolina Waterways during Six Month Period

More than one million gallons of sewage overflowed from inadequate wastewater infrastructure into the French Broad River and other area waterways in Western North Carolina according to state data acquired and analyzed by MountainTrue. The data was collected from August 3, 2020 until March 4, 2021 by the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality’s (DEQ) Asheville Regional office and is the best available estimate of the amount of sewage that overflows from wastewater infrastructures such as pipes and manhole covers into area rivers and streams across 19 counties of western North Carolina.

The Not-So-Micro Issue of Microplastics

The Not-So-Micro Issue of Microplastics

In our most recent blog post, our High Country Water Quality Administrator Hannah Woodburn explains that while personal change is important, our consumer choices alone are not enough to fix the plastics pollution crisis. Check out Hannah’s post to learn more about the history of plastic pollution, ongoing legislation to combat the issue and our sampling program to identify microplastics in WNC’s waters.