Vote 2018!

There are major issues affecting our environment and region in this year’s midterm elections. MountainTrue encourages all of our members to vote. Here are some FAQ’s about voting in North Carolina:

 

When is the latest I can update my voter registration or register to vote?
Do I need a photo ID to vote?
Do I need my voter registration card to vote?
Are voter registration forms available in other languages?
How will I know a change has been made to my voter record?
What if I just moved or I’m about to move?
Who can vote by mail-in absentee ballot?
Is there anything else I should know?

 

When is the latest I can update my voter registration or register to vote?

The deadline to update your voter registration or register to vote for the first time in the general midterms in North Carolina is October 12! Make sure you and your friends and family are registered before then. You can get a voter registration form here to register for the first time or to update your name, address or party affiliation. Then mail your completed form to the correct County Board of Elections office, which you can find here. Or, participate in early voting from October 17 to November 3 to register and vote at the same time.

 

Do I need a photo ID to vote?

No. On July 29, a federal court struck down photo ID requirements and associated laws in North Carolina. Unless the decision is appealed, photo ID will not be required in the upcoming general election. We will post further details as they become available.

However, there are certain voters who are required to show some form of identification when they present to vote – either “in person” or when voting “by mail.” First-time voters who at the time of their initial voter registration did not provide their North Carolina driver license number or the last four digits of their Social Security number, or who provided a number that could not be validated, will be required to show identification when they vote. This identification can be:

  • A current and valid photo ID
  • A copy of one of the following documents that show the name and address of the voter: a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document.

First-time voters who are required to show one of these forms of ID will be notified of this requirement by their county board of elections.

Do I need my voter registration card to vote?

No. A voter registration card simply confirms that the voter is registered, and provides specific details like the voter’s polling place. That information can also be found on the N.C. Board of Elections website through the Voter Lookup tool.

Are voter registration forms available in other languages?

Voter registration materials and instructions are currently available in both English and Spanish. Spanish forms are available here.

How will I know a change has been made to my voter record?

Once you’ve completed and mailed your changes to your local Board of Elections, allow two to six weeks for delivery of your voter identification card. Read the information thoroughly and note any changes or mistakes on the card. A voter identification card is for your use only; you do not need the card in order to vote.

What if I just moved or I’m about to move?

When you move within a county, you should complete an in-county change of address. This can be completed on your voter identification card, a signed letter to your local board of elections, or on the voter registration form specified above.

When you move from one county to another, you will need to apply for voter registration in your new county of residence. Use the form specified above, request that an application be mailed to you, or pick up a form at any local board of elections or public library. Note that when you move within the state, the law requires that you update the address on your driver’s license within 60 days. When you obtain a duplicate drivers license, you may also elect to update your voter registration information as well.

If you have moved before October 7 you will need to update your registration with your new address (or if applicable, register to vote in your new county of residence) no later than October 12. You will then be registered and may possibly have a new polling location. If you haven’t update your voter registration, you may still vote at your new polling location on election day as long as you haven’t moved out of the county of your existing registration. Since your move was unreported, you may be asked to vote on a provisional ballot.

If you have moved after October 7, you are still qualified to vote in your prior polling place on November 6 and may vote only there, even if you moved outside of your county.

Who can vote by mail-in absentee ballot?

Any registered voter. The voter doesn’t actually have to be absent on Election Day. Any registered voter can fill out the State Absentee Ballot Request form to request the ballot. Your signed and completed State Absentee Ballot Request Form must be received by your county board of elections no later than 5:00 p.m. on October 30 to be valid for this year’s general election. Learn more here.

 

Is there anything else I should know?

While it isn’t required, we recommend filling in your phone number on your voter registration form. If there are any problems processing your form, including a phone number will make it easy for the N.C. Board of Elections to contact you to resolve them. This will help avoid the surprise of showing up to the polls on Election Day and being unable to vote.

For more information on voting, visit the N.C. Board of Elections website.


Western North Carolina is blessed with more than 1.5 million acres of public land, including Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the Blue Ridge Parkway and several state-owned parks, forests and natural areas. These public lands support the headwaters of our rivers, beautiful mountain vistas, one of the most diverse temperate forests on the planet, and a thriving economy in tourism, crafts and recreation.
During its 30-year history, WNCA (now MountainTrue) has twice prevented logging in the Asheville Watershed, first in 1990 and again in 2004. Eventually the City of Asheville placed a conservation easement over 17,356 acres of the watershed.